Build Your Bridges: How to Improve Site Performance

“No man is an island” according to John Donne. Turns out, neither is no well-performing website.

Still, plenty of businesses build a website all about,and only about, them. It’s got their “about”, their FAQ’s, the contact pages, the list of services. Then, they go out and do their work.

There’s no blog to generate updated content.

There’s no social integration, online or otherwise.

They don’t participate in community events, initiatives, or charitable outlets.

Or, they do and never talk about it.

No one reviews them, links to them, or even really visits the site.

And, maybe the search engines don’t either, because they can’t access the site well. It’s just another pretty face with broken code and no inner optimization.

Sigh.

Here’s the analogy I always share: your website is an island. It’s real estate you buy and build upon. There’s an airstrip but only a few people have planes. What you need are bridges to the mainland. You need access pathways for your traffic to reach you.

It’s a web, this internet you built upon. Webs naturally have connections. If you aren’t connected, you aren’t truly here.

Incidentally, Jacksonville achieves connectivity through its many bridges over the St. John's River.

Incidentally, Jacksonville achieves connectivity through its many bridges over the St. John’s River.

 

 

Does Cost Predict Performance?

It’s a scary question. No one wants to invest in something that won’t get the job done. But there’s an even scarier question worth asking:

Does the performance reflect the cost?

There are so many examples out there of expensive things that don’t live up to their performance expectation. This is certainly true when it comes to products, tangible items. The phrase “durable goods” doesn’t mean what it used to. Things can be made more cheaply and they are, to the detriment of durability and very often, performance.

When it comes to products, sometimes you get what you pay for. Sometimes you don’t.

It’s true in the service industry as well. Services may be a bit more difficult to ethically cost slash…but we all know this is a global economy. Money in one country means something else in another. Outsourcing happens. And along the way a reminder has been experienced.

Sometimes you get what you pay for. Sometimes you don’t.

In my career experience I’ve seen some things go on that make me boil. Here are a few:

  • Expensive websites that are so cluttered and cumbersome to load that traffic clicks away before the page finishes.
  • Expensive websites that have broken code, no anayltics and no optmization. Which means, all the continued and ongoing resource the site owner pours into the site won’t mean squat.
  • Cheap writing that was generated by a machine; a paragraphed assembly of irrational keywords that aimlessly stab in the search engine dark.
  • Cheap writing that was created by someone with poor language proficiency, which saved the owner a few bucks and makes their business look really bad.
  • Stories from business owners who were sold on services and products that don’t effectively  help them achieve their goals and target their unique audience.
  • Stories from business owners who do things because they are sure they need to…but can’t really explain why. It’s a sure fire red flag of either a random approach or a bad sale.

I believe business owners, no matter the size of their company and the strength of the current economy, care about where they spend their resources. Most of those I’ve worked with value investment over expenditure. With an investment, performance surpasses cost.

With a defined vision, a planned content structure, quality products and services, and ongoing analytics and performance reports, that will happen.

Photo taken at the Dreamette, a Jacksonville favorite for dipped cones.

Photo taken at the Dreamette, a Jacksonville favorite for dipped cones.