Scaramouche, Scaramooch, Can You Do the Fandango? Also, Thank You Jane Kenyon

The same week that Apple programmed Siri to answer iphone users who said, “I see a little silhouetto of a man,” with, “Scaramouche, Scaramouche, can you do the fandango,” followed by the rest of the song’s lyrics by Queen, Anthony Scaramucci was hired to be the Communications Director for the White House. In his first interview to hit the press he mentioned cock-blocking and firing everyone who didn’t agree with him.

The dictionary defines a scaramouche as,

“a stock character in commedia dell’arte and farce who is a cowardly braggart, easily beaten and frightened.

and a fandango as,

1. a lively Spanish dance for two people, typically accompanied by castanets or tambourine.

2. a foolish or useless act or thing.

I recently began a formal break from social media. I did it to lessen the pain in my eyes from scrolling motion, to self-protect from the radical undulations of news suggesting our democracy is failing, and to satisfy a blood desire to meet a writing deadline. An occasional peek to see what a few loved ones had posted revealed the scary “mooch” (he referred to himself as The Mooch) and also a speech given at the Boy Scout Jamboree, which seems to be have been mistaken as another campaign rally to a crowd of his voters instead of a bipartisan organization made up primarily of children. Someone posted the speech Obama gave at the same event a few years ago and I felt my ears bleeding.

Remember the days when the administration of the free world spoke in complete sentences and kept their use of profanity within a professional decorum? I wonder if those who voted this situation into office remember these words:

15 “Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ravenous wolves. 16 You will know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes from thorn bushes or figs from thistles? 17 Even so, every good tree bears good fruit, but a bad tree bears bad fruit. 18 A good tree cannot bear bad fruit, nor can a bad tree bear good fruit. 19 Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. 20 Therefore by their fruits you will know them.

I sometimes want to add, “Ye shall know them by their vocabulary. Ye shall know them by their sentence structure. Ye shall know them by their education.” But who am I to do so.

I kind of like a world where a communications leader knows how to communicate well. And also, kindly. I also like a world where leaders lead from a position of intelligence and discretion.

Good fruit, according to the bible, which a majority of Republican voters say they revere, is:

  • love
  • joy
  • peace
  • patience
  • kindness
  • gentleness
  • goodness
  • faithfulness and,
  • self-control.

I heard one of his voters once say they didn’t expect him to be a pastor. They expect him to be a leader. Good luck getting grapes from that thorn bush. Or, maybe it’s the other way around: he’s the fruit from the tree of the voters.

Either way, Queen already said it. “Scaramouche, scaramoosh, can you do the fandango? Thunderbolt and lightning, very, very frightening.”

The remedy to this, a tonic offering temporary sanity during these troubled times, came from Jane Kenyon’s Advice to Writers.

Be a good steward of your gifts. Protect your time. Feed your inner life. Avoid too much noise. Read good books, have good sentences in your ears. Be by yourself as often as you can. Walk. Take the phone off the hook. Work regular hours.

July sunset in Florida, unfiltered.

 

 

We are all the same.

Equal Rights are Human Rights
On the way home from driving the carpool to school today, I was listening to our local public radio station’s morning show, First Coast Connect. They were discussing the ongoing struggle to get Jacksonville’s Human Rights Ordinance updated. This will be the third time the city council has voted on it. It’s still legal to discriminate against LGBT people in the workforce and in businesses here– people can be fired or refused basic service for being gay or transgendered. Jacksonville is the largest city in Florida without discriminatory protections. This has impacted which businesses come here and the hiring practices for those already here.
I have a friend who, I like to say, is the brother my parents never game me. I love him very much as well as his husband and the two sweet boys they adopted. Several years ago, after he left Jacksonville for New York and then Massachusetts, I was carping on how much I missed having him nearby and he said, “I’m sorry, I just don’t think Jacksonville is where I should be right now. It’s not where I can raise my family.” At the time he said this, “his family” would not have even been legally recognized here. Gay marriage was still banned here until 2014.
I was thinking about him this morning as I listened. An image came into my mind of him and his family sitting at a table in a restaurant. If I’m understanding things correctly, it’s legal for the restaurant owner here to refuse his family the same service they’d offer mine, specifically because they are a same-sex marriage.
Not because they were loud or disruptive in a way that harassed other guests. Not because they refused to pay the bill. Not because they broke any kind of law. Just because of who they are and how the business owner feels about that.
That is discrimination.
If that happened to them, there is no recourse they could take. Our current ordinance in Jacksonville sides with the restaurant owner to turn away anyone they please simply for who they are. It reminds me of pre-war Germany turning away those with yellow stars although, that was for the Jews. The nazis made gay men wear pink triangles and if they were gay and jewish, two of them like a pink star.
“There is neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female. You are all one….” (Galatians 3:28)
It really turned my stomach. And it stuck with me all day– key clue to, “use my words.” The end of that verse in Galatians is, “…in Christ Jesus.” The opposing group that’s prevented Jacksonville’s Human Rights Ordinance from passing is evangelical christians.
I wonder if those opposing have loved ones affected by discrimination. Have they considered the heartache and impact their position has on actual human beings? Can they remember these are not ideas but real lives being discussed? Do they realize that a culture that legalizes discrimination can simply swing back over to bite them in the ass? Christians have been discriminated against in history. They’ve been fired for who they are. Killed for who they are. I hope the Christian community, of which I am also a part of, sees the irony of the situation and remembers to do unto others as they’d have done unto them.
We live in a country that was built to allow freedoms to all. Human rights are equal rights.
*You can read more about Jacksonville’s Human Rights Ordinance and the upcoming February 14th vote by clicking on the link.
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Equal Rights are Human Rights